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Choose Your Own Adventure: Which Eucalyptus UI is Right for You?

UX Doctor

Open source projects can often lead to an embarrassment of riches that can really be confusing. This is especially true when it comes to tools you can use to interact with your Eucalyptus cloud.

Options include CLIs, SDKs, and different graphical user interfaces. Each has advantages and disadvantages, strengths and weaknesses, and is targeted to a specific kind of person.

Depending on what you want to do, your level of cloud knowledge, and the kind of user experience you desire, there is a Eucalyptus UI that will fit you perfectly. Let’s take a quick look at each and then you can Choose Your Own Adventure to help you find your ideal fit.

EUCALYPTUS USER CONSOLE

Eucalyptus User Console Dashboard

The Eucalyptus User Console is an open source project with development primarily done internally by Eucalyptus employees. We wanted to give our customers a graphical user interface for self-service deployment of virtual machines on Eucalyptus…

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Run Appscale on Eucalyptus

w00T!!!!!

shaon's blog

Cloud computing is the use of computing resources (hardware and software) that are delivered as a service over a network (typically the Internet). – Wikipedia

According to Wikipedia currently there are few popular service models exist.

1. Infrastructure as a service (IaaS)
2. Platform as a service (PaaS)
3. Software as a service (SaaS)

So, I have an Eucalyptus cloud, which is great, serves as AWS-like IaaS platform. But now I want PaaS. And right here Appscale comes into play with full compatibility of Google App Engine (GAE) applications. In this post, we will install the popular open source PaaS framework Appscale on Eucalyptus, the AWS compatible open source IaaS platform.

Agenda
0. Introduction
1. Resize Lucid image
2. Install Appscale from source
3. Install Appscale Tool
4. Bundle Appscale image
5. Run Appscale
6. Run an application on Appscale

Eucalyptus
Eucalyptus Cloud platform is open source software for building…

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Our little cloud boxes

Get some.

Greg DeKoenigsberg Speaks

A lot of people have been visiting our table in the OSCON Hack Zone — mostly because of the presence of our Little Black Boxes.

The common question we’ve heard: “where did you guys *get* those things?”

INORITE? They are *totally* cute.  We bought the parts and assembled them ourselves.  They are now Standard Issue to all new Eucalyptus engineers; a short stack of three gives any engineer enough firepower to do serious development and testing on the whole Eucalyptus stack.

Here’s the parts list from Amazon.com, courtesy of the talented and ruggedly handsome @zacharyjhill:

The main housing unit is an Intel NUC, about 4″ by 4″ by 2″. The SSD is available in different sizes; ours is 128GB. With some of the boxes, we only use 8GB of RAM and with others we use 16GB. We also like to have wireless, though it’s not required — and don’t forget the cheapo 

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Nice work by Lester! This will make deployment of your Euca cloud much much easier!

Take that to the bank and cash it!

The first cut of the Ansible deployment playbook for deploying Eucalyptus private clouds is ready.  I’ve merged the first “release” into the master branch here: https://github.com/lwade/eucalyptus-playbook. Feedback and contributions are very welcome, please file issues against the project.

This playbook allows a user to deploy a single front-end cloud (i.e. all component on a single system) and as many NC’s as they want.  Although admittedly I’ve only tested with one so far.  I’ve followed, to a certain degree, the best practices described here:  http://ansible.cc/docs/bestpractices.html

Overall I’m pretty happy with it, there are some areas which I’d like to re-write and improve but the groundwork is there.  It was all very fluid to start with and doing something multi-tier has been enjoyable. I’ve also learnt what its like to automate a deployment of Eucalyptus and there are probably a number of things we should improve to make it easier in this…

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Beautiful use case for Eucalyptus.

More Mind Spew-age from Harold Spencer Jr.

Recently, I did a blog discussing how to deploy a Jenkins server using Stackato, running on Eucalyptus.  At the end of that blog, I mentioned how the Eucalyptus Community Cloud (ECC) could be used for testing out the Stackato Microcloud image on Eucalyptus.   The previous blog – I felt – was more for DevOps administrators who had access to their own on-premise Eucalyptus clouds.  The inspiration of this blog comes from the blog on ActiveBlog entitled “Deploy & Scale Drupal on Any Cloud with Stackato” to show love to Web Developers, and show the power of Amazon’s Route 53.

Test Drive Pre-Reqs

The prerequisites for this blog are the same that are mentioned in my previous blog regarding using Stackato on Eucalyptus (for the Eucalyptus pre-reqs, make sure the ECC is being used).  In addition to the prerequisites mentioned above, the following is needed:

  • An…

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Very nice implementation of cobbler CLI tools. Great work Kyo!!

Kyo Lee

Nuclear-Devil-Horns

What is Metaleuca?

Metaleuca is a bare-metal provision management system that interacts with open-source software Cobbler via EC2-like CLI.

Using Metaleuca, users can communicate with Cobbler to self-provision a group of bare-metal machines to boot up with new, fresh OS images. The main appeal of Metaleuca is that it allows users to manage the bare-metal machines like EC2’s virtual instances via the command-lines that feel much like ec2-tools, or euca2ools.

euca_new_logo

ec2_logocobbler_logo

Metaleuca Command-Line Tools

Metaleuca consists of a set of command-lines that mirror some of the command-lines in ec2-tool or euca2ools. The list below shows a number of the core command-lines used in Metaleuca:

  • metaleuca-describe-profiles – Describe all the profiles provided in Cobbler
  • metaleuca-describe-systems – Describe all the bare-metal systems registered in Cobbler
  • metaleuca-reboot-system – Reboot the selected bare-metal system
  • metaleuca-run-instances – Initiate the provision sequence on the selected bare-metal systems
  • metaleuca-describe-instances – Describe the statuses of the provisioned…

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This will certainly become a tool that I use day to day. Thanks nurmi!

nurmiblog

Production deployments of Eucalyptus, like production deployments of any infrastructure software running in a data center, require some amount of health and status monitoring be happening in order to both allow the Eucalyptus/data-center administrator the ability to stay on top of evolving resource situations and to provide invaluable diagnostic information when something is going sideways within the resource pool.  Fortunately for all of us, there exists a wide variety of health/status monitoring system out there, and several of them are of extremely high quality, tried and tested, and are available as part of major Linux distributions as pre-packaged open-source solutions.  One such system that I’m a personal fan of is called Nagios.

To quote from their website:

“Nagios is a powerful monitoring system that enables organizations to identify and resolve IT infrastructure problems before they affect critical business processes.”

Indeed it is!  I first used Nagios is 2000/2001…

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